Injury Evaluation

Arthroscope.
An instrument used to visualize the interior of a joint cavity.
Arthroscopy.
A surgical examination of the internal structures of a joint by viewing through an arthroscope. An arthroscopic procedure can be used to remove or repair damaged tissue or as a diagnostic procedure in order to inspect the extent of the damage or confirm diagnosis.
Avascular Necrosis.
Death of a body part because of a lack of blood circulation.
Bone Scan.
An imaging procedure in which a radioactive-labeled substance is injected into the body to determine the status of a bone injury. A bone scan is particularly useful in diagnosing a stress fracture.
CT Scan.
Use of a computer to produce a cross sectional view of the anatomical part being investigated from X-ray data.
Chondral Fracture.
Fracture to the chondral (cartilaginous) surfaces of bone.
Degenerative Joint Disease.
Changes in the joint surfaces as a result of repetitive trauma.
Dislocation.
Complete displacement of joint surfaces.
Edema.
Accumulation of fluid in organs and tissues of the body; swelling.
Effusion.
Accumulation of fluid within a joint.
Fracture.
Breach in continuity of the bone. Types of fractures include simple, compound, comminuted, greenstick, incomplete, impacted, longitudinal, oblique, stress and transverse.
Heat Cramps.
Painful muscle spasms caused by excessive body heat and depletion of fluids and electrolytes. Can be prevented with acclimatization, attention to environmental heat stress and adequate fluid consumption.
Heat Exhaustion.
Mild form of shock to cardiovascular system likely a result of dehydration. Acclimatization, attention to environmental heat stress and fluid consumption will reduce risk of occurrence.
Heat Stroke.
Condition of rapidly rising internal body temperature.
Hemarthrosis.
Accumulation of blood within a joint as a result of an acute injury.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).
Imaging procedure in which a radio frequency pulse causes certain electrical elements of the injured tissue to react. MRI does not require radiation and is very useful in the diagnosis of soft tissue, disc and meniscus injuries.
Osteochondritis Dessicans.
A piece of bone and/or cartilage loosened from its attachment after trauma, it can cause a lesion.
Radiography.
Taking of X-rays.
Sprain.
A twisting, stretching, pulling or tearing of a ligament.
  • 1st Degree: A stretching but no tearing of a ligament. Athlete may either return to play immediately or will miss very little activity.
  • 2nd Degree: A partial tear of a ligament. Bracing may be required. Athlete may miss one to four weeks.
  • 3rd Degree: A complete tear of the ligament. Depending upon the ligament involved, bracing or even surgery may be required. Athlete may be out of activity from three weeks to one year or longer.
Strain.
The stretching, pulling or twisting of a muscle or tendon.
  • 1st Degree: A stretching but no tear of the muscle or tendon. Athlete may either return to play immediately or will usually miss very little activity.
  • 2nd Degree: A partial tear of a muscle or tendon. Athlete may miss one to four weeks.
  • 3rd Degree: A complete tear of a muscle or tendon. Depending upon the muscle or tendon involved, surgery may be required. Athlete may be out of activity from three weeks to one year or longer.
Subluxation.
Partial dislocation of a joint. The term usually implies that the joint can be returned to its normal position without formal reduction.
Synovitis.
Inflammation of the synovial lining of a joint.
Tendinitis.
Inflammation of the tendon and/or tendon sheath, usually caused by chronic overuse.
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